You are using an outdated browser. For a faster, safer browsing experience, upgrade for free today.

Loading...

Harlem Dowling-West Side Center for
Children & Family Services

As a not-for-profit child welfare agency, Harlem Dowling-West Side Center for Children and Family Services works to develops confidence, resilience, academic skills, and adult/family support that enables the children we serve to become responsible, self-sufficient adults.

More About Us.


Our Mission.

Develop confidence, resilience, academic skills, and adult/family support that enables the children we serve to become responsible, self-sufficient adults.

Our Vision.

Individuals and families are healthy, informed, and empowered to achieve self-sufficiency and to be engaged, responsible community members.

Our Origination.

Our original company name was The Association for the Benefit of Colored Children in the State of New York (also known as Colored Orphan Asylum).

OUR HISTORY

THE SUCCESSOR AND REMAINING ENTITY OF THE COLORED ORPHAN AYSLUM THAT WAS DESTROYED DURING NYC'S RACE RIOTS IN 1863, Harlem Dowling-West Side Center for Children & Family Services works to develops confidence, resilience, academic skills, and adult/family support that enables the children we serve to become responsible, self-sufficient adults. Founded in 1836 as the Colored Orphan's Asylum, the organization provides family preservation, family support services for children with development disabilities, after school programming, evidence-informed interventions, groups, and Emergency Food Pantry services to individuals residing in the New York City area.

Harlem Dowling was one of the first charitable institutions in the United States dedicated to children, and the very first to provide for "children of color". Founded by Anna Shotwell and Mary Murray, the orphanage quickly outgrew its first home, on West 12th St. near Sixth Avenue. By the 1840s, twenty years before the Civil War, larger quarters were constructed on Fifth Avenue between 43rd and 44th streets. The women hired James McCune Smith, the first African American doctor in America, to provide for the orphans. On July 13, 1863, during the draft riots, those who objected to fighting in the civil war burned the asylum to the ground. Miraculously, none of the 233 children residing at the orphanage were killed. The orphanage relocated first to 51st Street, and then to 143rd Street between Broadway and Amsterdam.

LEARN MORE

Co-Chair Message:


Welcome to the Harlem Dowling website. We hope you will take the time to learn about the services we provide to the community. Our children and families are in communities where jobs have been most deeply ravaged by the COVID-19 pandemic. Harlem Dowling's dedicated staff have met this challenge. Since mid-March of 2020, Harlem Dowling has served an increased number of individuals through their Emergency Food Pantry, provided cash assistance for food and other critical bills, assisted children with remote learning by providing IPAD Air devices, and connected families to additional resources in the community.

The Harlem Dowling Board is proud and grateful that Harlem Dowling was one of three organizations selected to receive proceeds from a Martin Luther King Jr. mask developed and auctioned by NHL player Alexandar Georgiev. Harlem Dowling also received the New York State award in recognition for our outstanding contributions to the growth, prosperity, and betterment of our community. But what we are most proud of is the everyday dedication of agency staff and managers who deliver high contact services to vulnerable people with the kind of care and respect that encourages change, healing and growth. This is the heart of our service. We are also deeply grateful to incredible donors who have enhanced the lives of our children by providing wonderful, special experiences, services or gifts that are so important in enlarging their lives.

We continue our strategic partnership with the Children's Village, another historic, well respected agency serving the needs of vulnerable children. We remain focused on building a long-term, solid foundation for the future of Harlem Dowling, by working with an energized board, fundraising, and attracting committed donors.

Jean Patton and Flor Saltiel, Co-Chairs
Harlem Dowling Board of Directors